Beyond Seven Review No. 78

Posted on Wed 08 September 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

Book and publishing history 🚟

  • Intellectual property - Counterpoint - ABC Radio National
    ABC episode on Intellectual property. Samir Chopra, Professor of Philosophy, interviewed.
  • Article Mainstream Macroeconomics and Modern Monetary Theory: What Really Divides Them? By Arjun Jayadev and J. W. Mason
    > Following Abba Lerner’s influential formulation, this component is often referred to as functional finance (Lerner 1943). Our goal here is not to make an assessment of MMT as a whole, but to ask what is the relationship between the functional finance approach to government budgets and conventional economic analysis. Because we are interested in the logic of the functional-finance position rather than in MMT as a body of thought, we make only limited references to MMT literature here. Our primary interest is in the merits of the functional finance position in the abstract. On the mainstream side, we are focused on what might be called “orthodox policy macroeconomics”—the practical heuristics that guide policy makers and are reflected in undergraduate textbooks, as opposed to DSGE and related models of intertemporal optimization that are the basis of most current macroeconomic theory. The relevant question is not whether MMT is consistent with models of this type, but whether it is consistent with the simpler, more reduced form models that are (explicitly or implicitly) drawn on by public officials and public and private-sector forecasters, as well as by academic economists when engaged in public discussions.

Counterantidisintermediation 🌔

Information and Geisteswissenschaften 🏺

  • Ethics of Digital Librarianship (1992)
    > Ethics of Digital Librarianship > Brewster Kahle > Thinking Machines (now brewster@archive.org) > February 1992 > Distributed with the freeware WAIS releases

Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 77

Posted on Wed 25 August 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

(Quantitative) cultural studies 🚣

Data analysis and Bayesian statistics ⚽


Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 76

Posted on Wed 11 August 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

Counterantidisintermediation 🌔

Data analysis and Bayesian statistics ⚽

Free/libre and open-source software 🌺

Information and Geisteswissenschaften 🏺

  • The Fake News Crisis That Wasn't
    "Bob speaks with Brendan Nyhan, government professor at Dartmouth College, about his latest study, Selective Exposure to Misinformation: Evidence from the consumption of fake news during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. Nyhan, along with scholars Andrew Guess and Jason Reifler, found that the echo chambers we feared were actually narrower, albeit deeper, than previously assumed."

Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 75

Posted on Wed 28 July 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

(Quantitative) literary history and sociology of literature 🦉

  • EN2C9/EN3C9 The Global Novel
    "Students taking this module will read novels from all around the world, from the 19th century to the present, within the framework of recent debates over world-literature, modernity, and the still unfolding process of globalisation. We will consider how widening our comparative and international perspective enables us to read and interpret novels (even the most seemingly ‘local’ or ‘national’ productions) as irresistibly ‘global’. The module analyses how certain novelistic forms, themes and issues ‘travel’. Students will discover ways in which certain works contain traces, adaptations and importations of ‘core’ (or global) issues, and adapt, remodel or reject them in accordance with local/national forms and expressions. Issues such as work/war/resources/imperialism/climate/finance/disaster/modernisation and others will be traced as we work to establish each novel's 'globality'. We will consider a number of elements in form and subgenre - magic realism/blog novels/graphic novels/speculative fiction/annalistic wiritng, but we will also look at each work's mediation, its commercial and cultural production and its geopolitical conditioning. You'll also pick up a solid understanding of the crucial issues and debates in globalisation. The module will read novels from Scotland to China, Saudi Arabia to Colombia, England to the U.S, and demonstrate why a global perspective is a necessary requisite for literary studies in the 21st century."

Counterantidisintermediation 🌔

Free/libre and open-source software 🌺

  • Files are fraught with peril
    Talk by Dan Luu on using files. "This is a psuedo-transcript for a talk given at Deconstruct 2019."
  • Security Guidelines for Congressional Campaigns
    "The good news is, if you follow these guidelines, you will have a high level of protection against being 'Podesta-ed'. The easiest way to get this protection is to form good security habits before you need them."

Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 74

Posted on Wed 14 July 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

Counterantidisintermediation 🌔

  • May First Movement Technology
    Looks a bit like riseup. Has been around since 2005. "We are a democratically-run, not-for-profit cooperative of movement organizations and activists in the United States and Mexico. We've been around since 2005 and our 850 members (mostly organizations and mainly in the U.S. and Mexico) host over 10,000 email address and over 2,000 web sites on our collectively owned and secured hardware that run exclusively on encrypted disks."

Free/libre and open-source software 🌺

Information and Geisteswissenschaften 🏺


Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 73

Posted on Wed 30 June 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

Book and publishing history 🚟

  • KENNYDALE BOOKS
    Self-published books by John Swartzwelder, an Emmy-winning writer for the Simpsons. I don't know anything about him nor have I read the books. I find it interesting that he has been self-publishing for so long.

Data analysis and Bayesian statistics ⚽


Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 72

Posted on Wed 16 June 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

Data analysis and Bayesian statistics ⚽

  • Don't treat ordinal data as metric -- update of movie ratings
    "In a previous post I applied a Bayesian ordered-probit model to movie ratings and showed how the results differ from treating the data as if they were metric. The metric model used frequentist t tests (because that's what most applied researchers would do). In this post, I re-analyze that data as if they metric but using a Bayesian model that has the same hierarchical structure as the Bayesian hierarchical ordered-probit model I used before. Here we can compare ordered-probit to metric treatments with all else held constant. Spoiler: Same conclusions, of course. The ordered-probit model fits the data much better than the metric model. Don't treat ordinal data as metric."

Information and Geisteswissenschaften 🏺

  • List of Physical Visualizations and Related Artifacts
    "This is a chronological list of physical visualizations and related artifacts, maintained by Pierre Dragicevic and Yvonne Jansen. Thanks to our contributors. If you know of another interesting physical visualization, please submit it! This list currently has 361 entries."
  • The BagIt File Packaging Format (V1.0)
    BagIt is a set of hierarchical file layout conventions designed to support storage and transfer of arbitrary digital content. A "bag" consists of a directory containing the payload files and other accompanying metadata files known as "tag" files. The "tags" are metadata files intended to facilitate and document the storage and transfer of the bag. Processing a bag does not require any understanding of the payload file contents, and the payload files can be accessed without processing the BagIt metadata.
  • When Science Fiction Meets Social Science
    Ada Palmer profile.

Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 71

Posted on Wed 02 June 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

(Quantitative) cultural studies 🚣

  • Endnotes
    Xavier Marquez's year-end list of recommended reading.

(Quantitative) literary history and sociology of literature 🦉

  • Project Runeberg
    Wikipedia: Project Runeberg (Swedish: Projekt Runeberg) is a digital cultural archive initiative that publishes free electronic versions of books significant to the culture and history of the Nordic countries. Patterned after Project Gutenberg, it was founded by Lars Aronsson and colleagues at Linköping University and began archiving Nordic-language literature in December 1992. As of 2015 it had accomplished digitization to provide graphical facsimiles of old works such as the Nordisk familjebok, and had accomplished, in whole or in part, the text extractions and copyediting of these as well as esteemed Latin works and English translations from Nordic authors, and sheet music and other texts of cultural interest.

Book and publishing history 🚟

  • Stumbling and Mumbling: My favourite economics papers
    The first one on the list is quite good. "“The elasticity of demand with respect to product failures” by Werner Troesken (pdf). This describes how Americans continued to buy snake oil for decades despite it being of dubious efficacy. It is of clear political relevance today: populists are using many of the tactics snake oil sellers used. But it has even wider relevance. It reminds us that whilst markets are selection devices they do not necessarily select for the best products, and can select for the worst."

Data analysis and Bayesian statistics ⚽


Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 70

Posted on Wed 19 May 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

(Quantitative) cultural studies 🚣

(Quantitative) literary history and sociology of literature 🦉

  • The Labor Market Value of Taste: An Experimental Study of Class Bias in U.S. Employment
    "This article investigates cultural forms of class bias in the middle-income U.S. labor market. Results from an audit study of employment discrimination in four U.S. cities reveal that cultural signals of class, when included in résumés, have a systematic effect on the callback rates of women applying to customer-facing jobs. For these women, displays of highbrow taste—the cultural signals of a higher-class background—generate significantly higher rates of employer callback than displays of lowbrow taste—the cultural signals of a lower-class background. Meanwhile, cultural signals of class have no systematic effect on the callback rates of male and/or non–customer-facing job applicants. Results from a survey-experimental study of 1,428 U.S. hiring managers suggest that these differing patterns of employer callback may be explained by the positive effect of higher-class cultural signals on perceptions of polish and competence and their negative effect on perceptions of warmth."

Free/libre and open-source software 🌺


Continue reading

Beyond Seven Review No. 69

Posted on Wed 05 May 2021 in Beyond Seven Review

Book and publishing history 🚟

  • We Need Bodice-Ripper Sex Ed
    Jennifer Weiner on the benefits of reading Harlequin novels: "But those [Harlequin romance novels], for all their soft-core covers and happily-ever-afters, were quietly and not-so-quietly subversive. They taught readers that sexual pleasure was something women could not just hope for but insist upon. They shaped my interactions with boys and men. They helped make me a feminist." Side note: Asking the New York Times website for this page (just the html page) yields a giant heap of garbage (317K, mostly javascript). The article itself is about 7.4K of text.

Information and Geisteswissenschaften 🏺

  • Advanced Degrees in Digital Humanities
    Not a bad list. Does mislead by conflating 4-year European Masters programs with 1-year US American Masters programs. German PhD programs are missing.
  • 30 Days of Stuff
    Post on the Internet Archive's blog by Jason Scott. Examples of wonderful public domain books and magazines available at IA.
  • The latch key of my bookhouse
    1922 book notable for being a "test vector" for the Internet Archive's book digitization process.

Continue reading